Cubs MLB Roster

Cubs Organizational Depth Chart
40-Man Roster Info

40 players are on the MLB RESERVE LIST (roster is full), plus one player is on the 60-DAY IL 

26 players on MLB RESERVE LIST are ACTIVE, nine players are on OPTIONAL ASSIGNMENT to minors, three players are on the 15-DAY IL, and two players are on the 10-DAY IL

Last updated 4-15-2024
 
* bats or throws left
# bats both

PITCHERS: 13
Yency Almonte
Adbert Alzolay 
Javier Assad
Ben Brown
Kyle Hendricks
* Shota Imanaga
Mark Leiter Jr
* Luke Little
Hector Neris 
Daniel Palencia
* Drew Smyly
Keegan Thompson
* Jordan Wicks

CATCHERS: 2
Miguel Amaya
Yan Gomes

INFIELDERS: 7
* Michael Busch 
Garrett Cooper
Nico Hoerner
Nick Madrigal
* Miles Mastrobuoni
Christopher Morel
Dansby Swanson

OUTFIELDERS: 4
* Cody Bellinger 
# Ian Happ
Seiya Suzuki
* Mike Tauchman 

OPTIONED: 9 
Kevin Alcantara, OF 
Michael Arias, P 
Pete Crow-Armstrong, OF 
Jose Cuas, P 
Brennen Davis, OF 
Porter Hodge, P 
* Matt Mervis, 1B 
Luis Vazquez, INF 
Hayden Wesneski, P 

10-DAY IL: 2 
Seiya Suzuki, OF
Patrick Wisdom, INF 

15-DAY IL: 3
Julian Merryweather, P
* Justin Steele, P  
Jameson Taillon, P 

60-DAY IL: 1 
Caleb Kilian, P 
 





Minor League Rosters
Rule 5 Draft 
Minor League Free-Agents

HERO

I never thought Ernie Banks passing would affect me like this. I'm not the type to be openly weeping but I am. Listening to the radio and hearing story after story of people that wanted to share their personal stories of meeting Ernie and the uplifting impact he had on everyone he touched. We are all little kids somewhere inside and Ernie was magic when it came to Cub fans. He was Chicago's treasure from the 1950's to the present. After his career, he became one of the greatest baseball Ambassadors, leading to him receiving the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2013. Mr. Cub was a wonderful ballplayer and a two time MVP shortstop. He was a hitter who had that amazing batting stance and power that came from his wrists.  Ernie was only the 7th player to hit 500 homers. He is one of the few that was a Cub his entire 19 season career which is itself a rarity. Of course, the Wrigley management was a part of that. Arizona Phil, in one of my favorite TCR posts ever (from 1-31-10) tells of several inflection points where the Cubs could have moved him, particularly when Leo Durocher was managing.

Leo also desperately wanted to get rid of Ernie Banks, but Phil Wrigley would NEVER agree to trade Ern. That was the one thing that Leo wanted that he couldn’t get. He could not get rid of Ernie Banks. Leo could not stand Ernie’s cheerfulness, optimism, and “let’s play two!” good fellowship, believing that nice guys like Ernie were losers, and Leo absolutely HATED losers.

Baseball is a team sport. Durocher was an often mean spirited man and was the antithesis to Ernie's love for people. Which one makes the  world become a better place? Joe Maddon responds to this in a better way, "Never let the pressure, exceed the pleasure."

Ernie came to the Majors in an era that brought breakthrough racial change to American society and he was a constant positive, always remaining upbeat in a time when life brought race related challenges every day. Ernie represented one of the perfect solutions to what Americans needed to overcome. Never a hot headed or angry man, everyone knew him as the eternal optimist ("the Cubs will be fine in sixty-nine"), he brought to so many Cub fans a philosophy that keeps us going in the face of what seems to be a never-ending wait for our time to get the brass ring.  I think many of us wanted to see Ernie's response to that day when the Cubs win the World Series. Now we will just have to imagine how he reacts, seated in the front row, from heaven above.

Have at it, by adding your own memories of Mr. Cub, as we celebrate his life. My favorite personal encounter with Ernie in 1979,  is in the following TCR link.
Close Encounters with Mr. Cub

Comments

Well Done Dr. Hecht. I did not think this would affect me like this is with tears rolling down my cheeks as I listen to the radio. As twcoffee said earlier, it is as well a piece of my childhood - a big piece - is gone. I had the chance to "meet" him at the U.S. Open at Medinah, when he and Billy Williams stopped next to my brother and I so we said hello. What a nice man. But I was fortunate enough, as Joe is, to have seen Ernie play at the Friendly Confines, attend double-headers, and see many game winning hits delivered by him with Brickhouse screaming on WGN. So sad he never tasted the thrill of a World Series. Oh well - may he and Ron have the chance to participate from wherever they are. R.I.P. Ernie! Let's Play Two!

One of the callers on the ESPN radio show this morning with Fred Huber/Mike Murphy suggested a great idea. They need to change the schedule on one Sunday every season, to a "true" doubleheader. The classic doubleheader, two games for the price of one (not the day/night version). Dedicate it to Ernie Banks. Murph suggested it be a league wide event in Ernie's memory. I think that has a chance of happening and would be a wonderful tribute to Let's play two.

[ ]

In reply to by John Beasley

Heh, be a lot of issues getting it approved by league and players. Would need to do it on weekend wrapped around a Thursday/Monday day off for both teams so they don't have to waste that emergency call-up on purpose.

Can't see owners going for it and losing revenue on a game, could see Cubs doing it once a year in April or Sept when attendance is usually lower, although hopefully not much longer in Sept.

Thanks for the write-up Doc. Glad someone with a bit more personal connection got to do it. I do have a signed Ernie Banks/Sammy Sosa ball my wife bought me which I'll always cherish. 

otherwise all my Ernie memories are rain delay theater on WGN. Must have seen that 500th HR call a couple dozen times.

[ ]

In reply to by Rob G.

"otherwise all my Ernie memories are rain delay theater on WGN." same. as much as i've enjoyed reading about ernie and watching old footage over the years, i've barely seen the guy play aside from some obvious highlights. i guess it says a lot about ernie that i've seen at least 10x more footage of him talking or others talking glowingly about him even though he's a HOF player with enough footage to speak for itself.

My Ernie story: ten years ago, my son (age 7) and I were waiting for a table at a restaurant. Ernie was chatting with people at the bar. When the people left, my son asked if I thought it would be OK for him to go and say hello. I said yes, Ernie seemed to be enjoying talking with people. So, my son goes over, Ernie asks him if he plays baseball and what position, then asks my son to show him his pitching motion. My son does, with great earnestness, and Ernie nods. "OK, now show me your left-handed pitching motion." My son tries and nearly falls over. Big laugh and a slap on the back from Ernie; big laugh and a lifelong memory for my son. He was a really nice man who knew what it meant to be a baseball hero to a kid. We could use a lot more like him. RIP #14.

[ ]

In reply to by crunch

Doug Glanville is a truly wonderful writer.
His smile told that story. It made me not worry. It made me proud, and maybe most importantly, it made me see baseball as being one of our greatest assets. And that even when race matters, we still have the power to encourage our country to live out its best, to be bigger than race. Ernie Banks always knew we would ultimately get to a place of harmony, and amazingly, Mr. Cub didn't even have to say a word for you to understand that. He made you feel it. Always.

Getting the formatting thing again (Firefox) both on the main page and now (newly) in the articles and comments too. Just FYI! Thanks for all the trouble-shooting time you put into this site in addition to writing, editing, etc., Rob.

[ ]

In reply to by Charlie

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rob_Manfred he's got the cred...but him coming out swinging this early with something so radical causes one to pause. that said, i don't think the owners or player's reps would let him get away with something like this. it's the solution to a problem no one's complaining about...and those that do care spend most of the time blaming the batter for not tapping one into the hole rather than the D ruining what the batter wants to do. hell, even on the "delay of game" angle it's barely a blip compared to other issues which can be addressed without heavily effecting the strategy of the game.

Excerpt from a Fred Mitchell article in today's Tribune...Joey Banks, is one of his twin sons.
While none of Banks’ children was in attendance at the news conference Sunday, one of his sons, Joey Banks, was contacted by the Tribune by phone. “I realized that people loved him,” the 55-year-old California resident said. “I didn’t know what his contributions were to the team. It was something I didn’t really get. I realized that he was consistent. He was special, and people treated him kind of like that.” Banks declined to discuss the specifics of his father’s health but said he spoke with his father regularly and that the frequency of the calls had decreased in recent months. Increasingly, Joey Banks said, he would call his father and leave a message. “That became more frequent, and that worried me,” Joey Banks said. “He used to call me every Sunday.” In recent months, Ernie Banks had a “health care person” living with him to ensure he took his medication and ate correctly, Joey Banks said. Joey Banks, a truck driver, said he last spoke with his father about 10 days ago and he had grown concerned about his father’s health in recent weeks. His father would answer the phone, Joey Banks said, but then he handed the phone over to someone else. “He didn’t speak very long,” Joey Banks recalled. He said he last saw his father in June, at an Ernie Banks bobblehead night at Wrigley Field.

My Ernie story is not special but part of it remains really vivid. I was maybe 5-6 and I don't even recall why, or where, it happened, but I was introduced to him and Jack Brickhouse, who both signed a copy of Ernie's book they did together. (Years later, like an idiot, I tore the autographs out of the book to put with other autographs.) I don't know if I realized who they were, but I do know that I was in awe. And then Ernie left and I looked out the front of the building, and Ernie waved to me from his car. I can see that part of as if it happened yesterday.

Recent comments

  • George Altman (view)

    Ditto. The can DFA him when they activate Taillon.

  • crunch (view)

    cade horton with his 2024 AA debut of 4ip 4h 0bb 4k, 1r/0er is followed up even better...

    4ip 1h 1bb 5K, 0r/er

    he's still on a pitch count restriction, btw.  he probably could have gone 6+ innings in both outings if he was off a leash.

  • crunch (view)

    okay, officially done with hendricks as a starter.

    dunno if counsell is there, but i'm there.

  • Bill (view)

    That pretty well sums up the situation.  Epstein, the media and the fans became obsessed with the concept of a "window of opportunity" that had to be taken advantage of before it closed.  Thus the trade for Quintana, and the trade of Soler for crap.

    The way to deal with a "window of opportunity" is not to sacrifice everything to win, but to extend that window.  Epstein knew that he was having his best players, Rizzo, Baez and Bryant in the same year, with Contreras the following year, at the same time that the pitching staff was growing elderly and on the verge of declining.  A responsible administration would have moved one of the ""core" two years earlier, and a second one the next year, in order to prevent the otherwise necessity of "tanking" when they left at the same time.  they had to know that there was no way they could have all been extended, and still leave room for growth.

    Other than the Dodgers and the Yankees, no team can maintain a consistent level of production without a consistent flow of high ceiling, low cost controlled young players coming up from the farm.  We have lived through the errors of the past, and hopefully have learned enough from them to prevent a reoccurance of it in a few years.

  • TarzanJoeWallis (view)

    I think it was pretty clear that practically all of “the core” was going to be gone after the 2021 season and that utterly gutting the farm system to chase a championship with the same guys year after year until they all departed wasn’t going to end well. That was talked about as early as 2017.

    I don’t think it’s hindsight to say they would have been better off from a sustainability standpoint trading some of those pieces for the best prospect packages available and introducing some of the kids. For example, I was hoping real time they would trade Schwarber during the 2016 offseason to an AL team as a DH when the DH was AL only. Fresh off being a WS hero he could have fetched quite a haul. But, alas, he was a member of the vaunted, untouchable “core”.

  • TarzanJoeWallis (view)

    What would have surprised me is the Dodgers, who have traditionally been outstanding in evaluating and developing talent, giving away Busch for nothing. They obviously saw something in both of the guys. Perhaps one or both will be future superstars.

    That said, the old cliche is that the level of competition increases ten fold for every level moved up. Ferris and Hope both have a long way to go. We’ll just have to wait and see.

    For now, I’m watching Busch put the team on his shoulders while the presumed offensive star of the team flails and doesn’t seem to have a plan beyond “waiting for the numbers to even out”. 

    I thought it was a good and fair trade at the time - a talented but surplus guy for the Dodgers that filled an immediate need for the Cubs in exchange for potential pieces of the Dodgers future - and I’m awfully glad Busch is a Cub.

  • First.Pitch.120 (view)

    Mostly agree, but I don’t think it was as much “unshakeable faith” as it was a series of unclear choices in the moment that have become obvious with hindsight.  

    The upside outcome for the coming year for any player was always much higher than the return on selling. It was like Texas Hold’em purgatory of having 4 to an A-K led flush…  impossible to get away from. 


     

  • Dolorous Jon Lester (view)

    He works quickly too so all that happened in probably like 4 minutes 

  • crunch (view)

    as of now, zyhir hope is the dodgers #20 prospect on mlb.com (ferris #7).  he made 0 national "top 100" overall lists.  that may be a different story soon enough.

    if hope is not in the team top-10 by year's end i would be shocked.

    i don't know what happened between draft day and a couple months in arizona, but he got the attention of many organizations outside of the cubs when he showed up.

  • crunch (view)

    ...and he takes a comebacker off the knee on pitch 7.  out made, run scored.

    pitch 9 is a 3 run homer.  amazing.